invites all junior faculty to interact with senior experts at our Monthly Clinical Scholar Seminar

Speaker

Caroline Motika, MD

Date

June 20, 2011, 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Location

KCBD
8260

Description

ITME-SM invites all junior faculty to interact with senior experts at our Monthly Clinical Scholar Seminar


Submitting Unit:
Institute for Translational Medicine
Type of Event: Seminar

Date of Event
Monday, June 20 2011
Start Time: 5:00 PM
End Time: 6:30 PM
Building: Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery Room
8260

Name of Series, Lectureship, Ceremony:
Monthly Clinical Scholar Seminar

Title of talk or presentation:
invites all junior faculty to interact with senior experts at our Monthly Clinical Scholar Seminar

Speaker’s Name and Degrees:
Nancy Jean Cox, PhD and Caroline Motika, MD

Description
The Institute for Translational Medicine invites all junior faculty to interact with senior experts at our Monthly Clinical Scholar Seminar. The seminar encourages K career award scholars and those interested in pursuing K awards to engage senior experts on a variety of research topics.

The June 20 seminar will feature:

Senior Expert: Nancy Jean Cox, PhD, Professor and Section Chief, Section of Genetic Medicine, Department of Medicine; Professor, Department of Human Genetics

Career Award Scholar: Caroline Motika, MD, Post-doctoral Fellow, The University of Chicago, Laboratory of Carole Ober Genetic Studies of Ashtma and Lung Functioning Phenotypes in Hutterites

For more information, please contact Sonya Redmond-Head, ITM Career Award Administrator, at srhead@bsd.uchicago.edu

This seminar series is supported by the Institute for Translational Medicine, National Center for Research Resources/National Cancer Institute/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the University of Chicago.

Contact Name
Tracy Loope

Contact Email
tloope@bsd.uchicago.edu

Contact Phone
773-702-6739

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