Evolutionary analyses of new-generation sequencing data

Speaker

Rasmus Nielsen, PhD

Date

January 12, 2012, 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Location

KCBD
1103

Description

IGSB-SM Evolutionary analyses of new-generation sequencing data

Submitting Unit:
Institute for Genomics & Systems Biology
Type of Event: Seminar
Date of Event: Thursday, January 12 2012
Start Time: 4:00 PM
End Time: 5:00 PM
Building: Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery, Room 1103

Name of Series, Lectureship, Ceremony:
IGSB Seminar Series

Title of talk or presentation:
Evolutionary analyses of new-generation sequencing data

Speaker’s Name and Degrees:
Rasmus Nielsen, PhD

Speaker’s Institutional Affiliation:
Department of Integrative Biology and Statistics, University of California, Berkeley

Abstract:
New-generation sequencing data has transformed the biological sciences, allowing us to address research questions that previously were considered intractable. In this talk I will discuss computational methods for analyzing such data, and discuss some applications to population genetic data. In one project we sequenced the exomes of representative Han Chinese and Tibetan humans to elucidate the genetic causes of altitude adaptation in Tibetans. We show that selection on the EPAS1 gene can explain previously described physiological differences between Han Chinese individuals and Tibetans. I will also discuss applications in other systems including other humans, such as the sequencing of the first Aboriginal Australian genome, and ancient DNA including Neanderthal DNA.


Contact Name
Amane Isa

Contact Email
aisa@bsd.uchicago.edu

Contact Phone
773-834-5127

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