Conservation, divergence and epistasis in evolution of gene regulation

Date

September 12, 2011, 4:30 pm – 5:45 pm

Location

BSLC
008

Description

ECEV-SM Conservation, divergence and epistasis in evolution of gene regulation

Submitting Unit: Ecology & Evolution
Type of Event: Seminar
Date of Event: Monday, September 12 2011
Start Time: 3:30 PM
End Time: 4:45 PM
Building: BSLC Room 008

Name of Series, Lectureship, Ceremony:
Seminar

Title of talk or presentation:
Conservation, divergence and epistasis in evolution of gene regulation

Speaker’s Name and Degrees:
Dr. Ilya Ruvinsky, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Evolution

Speaker’s Institutional Affiliation:
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago

Description:
Ilya Ruvinsky, PhD - Conservation, divergence and epistasis in evolution of gene regulation

Over the last few years our efforts have focused on dissecting nematode cis-regulatory elements to infer general rules that govern evolution of gene regulation. I will highlight several recent results. One reveals how different functional constraints can contribute to different evolutionary rates across genomes. Another suggests that coevolution is likely rampant both within cis-element and between these elements and the interacting transcription factors. What emerges is a complex picture of regulatory evolution in which subtle, lineage-specific, and compensatory modifications of interacting cis- and trans-regulators together maintain conserved gene expression patterns.

Contact Name:
Noami Perez

Contact Email:
nmiranda@uchicago.edu

Contact Phone:
773-702-1988

 

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